Nokia Sues Apple Again, This Time In Europe

Nokia has been under a great deal of pressure lately to perform strong. The company has lagged behind major smartphone vendors, and they're starting to lose their massive grip on the worldwide cellphone market. Their low-end phones still dominate sales in many developing nations, but in North America, the iPhone and lots of Android phones have lapped Nokia's N8 and other high-end, Symbian-based solutions. But that hasn't stopped the company's legal team from being on top of their gae.

Nokia has announced this week that they have filed claims in the UK High Court, Dusseldorf and Mannheim District Courts in Germany and the District Court of the Hague, Netherlands, alleging that Apple infringes Nokia patents in many of its products sold in these countries, including iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Those allegations are pretty serious, and obviously they're between two bitter rivals. Nokia already has lawsuits fired in Apple's direction, and this adds 13 more to the list of 24. Paul Melin, vice president, Intellectual Property at Nokia, explained the situation as such:

"These actions add 13 further Nokia patents to the 24 already asserted against Apple in the US International Trade Commission and the Delaware and Wisconsin Federal courts. The Nokia inventions protected by these patents include several which enable compelling user experiences. For example, using a wiping gesture on a touch screen to navigate content, or enabling access to constantly changing services with an on-device app store, both filed more than ten years before the launch of the iPhone."

We have a feeling this scuffle is far from over, but who knows if Nokia's legal matters will be able to halt Apple. That company has been blazing a path the past few years, and it just feels unlikely that a little legal hurdle will really hold things up.


Nokia files patent infringement complaints against Apple in the UK, Germany and the Netherlands

Espoo, Finland - Nokia announced it has filed claims in the UK High Court, Dusseldorf and Mannheim District Courts in Germany and the District Court of the Hague, Netherlands, alleging that Apple infringes Nokia patents in many of its products sold in these countries, including iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

"These actions add 13 further Nokia patents to the 24 already asserted against Apple in the US International Trade Commission and the Delaware and Wisconsin Federal courts," said Paul Melin, vice president, Intellectual Property at Nokia. "The Nokia inventions protected by these patents include several which enable compelling user experiences. For example, using a wiping gesture on a touch screen to navigate content, or enabling access to constantly changing services with an on-device app store, both filed more than ten years before the launch of the iPhone."

Nokia's filing in the UK covers 4 Nokia patents related to touch user interface, on-device app stores, signal noise suppression and modulator structures.

Nokia's filing in Dusseldorf, Germany covers 7 Nokia patents related to touch user interface, antenna structures, messaging functionality and chipsets.

Nokia's filing in Mannheim, Germany covers 5 Nokia patents related to on-device app stores, caller ID, display illumination and the integration of multiple radios.

Nokia's filing in the Hague, Netherlands covers 2 Nokia patents related to signal noise suppression and data card functionality.

None of the asserted patents have been declared essential to any wireless communication standard.

During the last two decades, Nokia has invested approximately EUR 40 billion in research and development and built one of the wireless industry's strongest and broadest IPR portfolios, with around 11,000 patent families. Nokia is a world leader in the development of handheld device and mobile communications technologies, which is also demonstrated by Nokia's strong patent position.
Comments
3vi1 4 years ago

I can't say I feel sorry for Apple, having been abusive with their own patents.

In the end, we the users are losing, in multiple ways. We end up paying inflated prices as the companies mark up the prices to pay the lawyers... and small innovative companies end up locked out of the market due to the huge legal barrier presented by patents on obvious implementations.

The patent system needs an overhaul, and software patents just need to be thrown out entirely.

FaceTheSlayer 4 years ago

I don't like neither company. And yes, software patent system is idiotic.

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